Sunday, 18 August 2013

Hyning Monastery

We visited here this morning.  We had hoped to attend our local church over the hill, but a combination of health issues and the clock ticking meant otherwise.  The sisters at Hyning who follow the Rule of St Benedict, were very welcoming since  all guests are to be greeted as if Christ himself were awaiting at the door.  I for one was in great need of some peace and quiet as the events of this past year have taken its toll and my spirit has been laid low for some time.

  The kids were very quiet in the chapel, we spent twenty minutes in silence, Benedict read some of the prayer book and Pip gazed at the icons dotted around an otherwise sparsely converted barn.  At twelve o'clock we joined the community for the noon time office of prayers.  Upon leaving we were handed a bagful of delicious tomatoes, our own crop having failed due to inadequate watering, they made tasty sandwiches for lunch!

After lunch Pip and I decorated two large church candles, which were originally intended as part of an Easter project, but a grand-baby's arrival put paid to all sorts of planned activities!  We left them to dry on the outside table and spent the rest of the afternoon building jigsaws and playing board games.  Dave made a yummy chilli for lunch and Benedict played with Lego.

Psalm 147 v 3 "He heals the broken hearted and binds up their wounds"  This quote from scripture has been running around and around in my head today and at the days end, I can look back and see His healing hand in my present circumstances.  His love is faithful and never ending.

10 comments:

  1. What a beautiful and peaceful place, San. I can see how it helped your day unfold in such a soothing and healing way. It's a special gift. I send all of you love and prayers for good health.

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  2. You seem to have quite a few monasteries near by, don't you? I have been wondering about the percentage of Catholics in your area, what is it in comparison to the Anglican church? Also, do you know anything about your Catholic family history? Jonathan has been reading quite a few books about the persecution of Catholics in Great Britain many centuries ago. Do you know if that has happened to your family? When we were in London we thought there was a good presence of Catholics, but I'm not sure about other parts of Great Britain. Just curious.

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  3. Hmm, I will have to try and find out the ratio of Catholics to Anglicans and as for my catholic family history, my Dad's immediately family were converts and my Mum's family originally hailed from Ireland, so I think it's highly unlikely they were involved in the persecutions.

    My Dad has been compiling a family tree but has only managed to retrace to the 1800's, anything further back would require him to visit areas and churchyards that span the length of the British Isles ... a costly exercise!

    Dave also worked on his family tree many years ago, so I'll have to ask him if he'd managed to uncover anything faith related.

    San x

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  4. I am sorry to hear that you are still struggling with your health and that you are having a hard time of it. I hope there is a light at the end of the tunnel for you, however small, that will give you some hope of ease.

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  5. Hi, I spent a wonderful day at Hyning a few years ago, soaking in the atmosphere, and relaxing. I would love to visit again. xx

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    1. Dave’s mum was a convert to Catholicism from Methodism. His Catholic routes are a thin line. The only Catholics by birth were his father, grandfather and great grandmother. Her father (Dave's great great grandfather) came from Wexford in Ireland in the 1860’s which is thus likely to be the family history source of Dave’s catholic roots.

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    2. Interesting, have you ever been to Ireland? Do you still have relatives there? Are there many Methodists in Great Britain?

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  7. (DH)Although the persecution of our ancestors was probably more due to the atrocious conditions of Irish tenants, the Lancashire area of northwest England has a long catholic history. The major city 20 miles to the south of us, Preston, derives its name from ‘enclosure of the priests’ and Lancashire during the Reformation was a place of great persecution of Catholics, with more being martyred in Lancaster than anywhere else next to Tyburn in London. There is a shrine at Ladywelle just outside Preston and a stone near the Lancaster Cathedral.

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    1. I'll mention that to Jonathan, he is reading "Come Rack, Come Rope," which takes place in Derbyshire. Thanks for the info.

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